Play analysis a streetcar named desire

Blanche is a loquacious and fragile woman around the age of thirty.

Play analysis a streetcar named desire

Blanche is in her thirties and, with no money, has nowhere else to go. Blanche tells Stella that she has taken a leave of absence from her English-teaching position because of her nerves which is later revealed to be a lie. Blanche laments the shabbiness of her sister's two-room flat.

She finds Stanley loud and rough, eventually referring to him as "common". Stanley, in return, does not care for Blanche's manners and dislikes her presence. Stanley later questions Blanche about her earlier marriage. Blanche had married when she was very young, but her husband died, leaving her widowed and alone.

The memory of her dead husband causes Blanche some obvious distress. Stanley, worried that he has been cheated out of an inheritance, demands to know what happened to Belle Reve, once a large plantation and the DuBois family home. Blanche hands over all the documents pertaining to Belle Reve.

While looking at the papers, Stanley notices a bundle of letters that Blanche emotionally proclaims are personal love letters from her dead husband. For a moment, Stanley seems caught off guard over her proclaimed feelings.

Afterwards, he informs Blanche that Stella is going to have a baby. This can be seen as the start of Blanche's mental upheaval. The night after Blanche's arrival, during one of Stanley's poker parties, Blanche meets Mitch, one of Stanley's poker player buddies.

His courteous manner sets him apart from the other men. Their chat becomes flirtatious and friendly, and Blanche easily charms him; they like each other. Suddenly becoming upset over multiple interruptions, Stanley explodes in a drunken rage and strikes Stella.

Blanche and Stella take refuge with the upstairs neighbor, Eunice. When Stanley recovers, he cries out from the courtyard below for Stella to come back by repeatedly calling her name until she comes down and allows herself to be carried off to bed. After Stella returns to Stanley, Blanche and Mitch sit at the bottom of the steps in the courtyard, where Mitch apologizes for Stanley's coarse behavior.

Blanche is bewildered that Stella would go back to her abusive husband after such violence.

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The next morning, Blanche rushes to Stella and describes Stanley as a subhuman animal, though Stella assures Blanche that she and Stanley are fine. Stanley overhears the conversation but keeps silent. When Stanley comes in, Stella hugs and kisses him, letting Blanche know that her low opinion of Stanley does not matter.

As the weeks pass, Blanche and Stanley continue to not get along. Blanche has hope in Mitch, and tells Stella that she wants to go away with him and not be anyone's problem. During a meeting between the two, Blanche confesses to Mitch that once she was married to a young man, Allan Grey, whom she later discovered in a sexual encounter with an older man.

Grey later committed suicide when Blanche told him she was disgusted with him. The story touches Mitch, who tells Blanche that they need each other.

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It seems certain that they will get married. Later on, Stanley repeats gossip to Stella that he has gathered on Blanche, telling her that Blanche was fired from her teaching job for having sex with a student and that she lived at a hotel known for prostitution the Flamingo.

Stella erupts in anger over Stanley's cruelty after he states that he has also told Mitch about the rumours, but the fight is cut short as she goes into labor and is sent to the hospital. As Blanche waits at home alone, Mitch arrives and confronts Blanche with the stories that Stanley has told him.Need help with Scene 9 in Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire?

Play analysis a streetcar named desire

Check out our revolutionary side-by-side summary and analysis. Blanche suggests that she and Stella contact a millionaire named Shep Huntleigh for help escaping from New Orleans; when Stella laughs at her, Blanche reveals that she is completely broke.

Stanley walks in as Blanche is making fun of him and secretly overhears Blanche and Stella’s conversation. For A-level, Eduqas specification, a revision pack for ‘Duchess of Malfi’ and ‘Streetcar Named Desire’. The emphasis is much more on ‘Duchess of Malfi’ (‘Streetcar’, as an AS text, is more likely to have been already read, so focus is on ‘Duchess’ and lin.

A Streetcar Named Desire () is a subversive, steamy film classic that was adapted from Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize-winning play (his first) of the same name. [Note: Early working titles for the play included The Moth, Blanche's Chair on the Moon, and The Poker Night.] Playwright.

Antony And Cleopatra: Theme Analysis, Free Study Guides and book notes including comprehensive chapter analysis, complete summary analysis, author biography information, character profiles, theme analysis, metaphor analysis, and top ten quotes on classic literature.

A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams And so it was I entered the broken world To trace the visionary company of love, its voice An instant in the wind (I know not whither hurled).

SparkNotes: A Streetcar Named Desire: Themes